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Celebrating Law!

May 1 is officially recognized as Law Day.  First proclaimed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1958, the Day is intended to highlight the importance of law in our society.  As President Eisenhower noted, “It is fitting that the people of this Nation should remember with pride and vigilantly guard the great heritage of liberty, justice, and equality under law which our forefathers bequeathed to us.”

This year’s theme is American Democracy and the Rule of Law: Why Every Vote Matters.  As part of his Gettysburg Address, President Abraham Lincoln expressed the hope “that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”  The very foundation of a government by the people is the right to vote.  Striving to establish and protect every citizen’s right to vote has been a central theme of American legal and civic history.  We see it today as part of the litigation over the recently passed Voter Photo ID law in Pennsylvania.

The Berks County Bar Association will be celebrating Law Day with its annual luncheon on April 30 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel. The program will include music provided by the Fleetwood High School Choraliers, announcing the winner of the County Mock Trial Competition, recognizing the winners of the 5th and 6th grade essay contest and the awarding of the Howard Fox Scholarship.

To reflect on the importance of the citizen’s right to vote, there is no one more qualified to be our keynote speaker than Susan B. Anthony, who fought for women to be granted the right to vote.  The actress, Margaret Goldman, from the American Historical Theatre in Philadelphia, will portray the famous suffragette.  It will be entertaining and educational!

Tickets are $20 each.  Download the registration form here. Once completed, please send it, together with payment, to BCBA, P. O. Box 1058, Reading, PA 19603 so that it will arrive at the office by April 22.

Looking for a Lawyer?

Have you just been served with a complaint seeking to foreclose on your home or to change the child custody arrangement or to evict you from your apartment?  Or are you considering bankruptcy?

You need to consult with an attorney.  Our members are skilled attorneys who can fight for your rights, draft valid legal documents and stand by you in the courtroom.  Don’t be misled by television ads for online legal forms.  Notaries and petition preparers cannot give legal advice or accompany you to court.  And “do-it-yourself” law is a fast lane to disaster.   Our members know Pennsylvania law, are available for personal consultations and are accountable to you. 

If you feel overwhelmed looking for the attorney right for you, go here for more information on what the Berks County Bar Association can do for you.

Foreclosure Mediation Program Continues

The Berks County Bar Association, in conjunction with the Berks County Courts and Neighborhood Housing Services, have created a program by which those threatened with the loss of their home can seek relief. The program began January 1 and is continuing.  Those served with a complaint in a consumer debt or home mortgage case may take advantage of the program.

Read More› for a description of the program.

The program is also explained on a recent "Ask a Lawyer" television show. Go here to view the program. As of July 16, 216 cases have requested to participate. Go here for a detailed update.

provided by the UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH SCHOOL OF LAW

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